May 2007

Executive compass | May 2007

2007 BAE SYSTEMS GXP International User Conference wrap-up

Dan London

On behalf of the GXP team, I’d like to thank those of you who travelled to San Diego to participate in the 2007 BAE SYSTEMS GXP International User Conference last month. We were pleased to see such a great turnout this year, and enjoyed meeting with you personally.

It’s gratifying to visit with customers, learn the numerous ways SOCET SET® and SOCET GXP® are used in your workflows, and understand the challenges you face. The annual User Conference gives us the opportunity to share new developments and demonstrate technology in the pipeline that will be introduced in forthcoming releases. As we look ahead, we are excited about new capabilities on the horizon. We’re glad that you have chosen GXP software, and our team is working hard to implement enhancements, many of which will deliver significant productivity improvements.

As always, we look forward to hearing from you throughout the year. Remember to check our website, www.baesystems.com/gxp, regularly for news and product updates, participate in the discussion forum, download current software patches, and read about training opportunities and conferences taking place in your region. We encourage you to visit us at industry events to learn about new software capabilities, including spatially enabled exploitation (SEE) and next-generation automatic terrain extraction (NGATE).

Don’t forget to mark your calendars for next year’s Conference:

2008 BAE SYSTEMS GXP International User Conference
April 7 – 11, 2008
Hilton La Jolla Torrey Pines

We look forward to seeing you.

Sincerely,
Dan London
Dan London
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
BAE Systems GXP

GXP in the news | May 2007

Congratulations to Dr. Bingcai Zhang

Dr. Bingcai Zhang accepts plaque honoring his induction as BAE Systems Engineering Fellow

Dr. Bingcai Zhang accepts plaque honoring his induction as BAE Systems Engineering Fellow

Dr. Bingcai Zhang, Lead Engineer and Manager of R&D, BAE Systems GXP, was named BAE Systems Engineering Fellow at the annual Engineering Awards Banquet on April 12, 2007 in Nashua, New Hampshire. Dr. Zhang is recognized for his expertise in software development for photogrammetry, image processing, and geospatial information systems. For over 12 years, he has made significant contributions to BAE Systems’ world class applications, including SOCET SET and SOCET GXP, and has published numerous professional papers in the photogrammetric mapping field. His most recent contributions include the SOCET for ArcGIS and NGATE modules for SOCET SET.

This distinguished recognition is reserved for a select subset of engineers and scientists who have consistently demonstrated extraordinary technical expertise, creativity, and contributions within their technical discipline, and have shown the ability and willingness to collaborate with all levels of the organization. The BAE Systems Engineering Fellows program is an honor bestowed on only 1% of the company’s engineers.

For over 20 years, Bingcai has been making excellent contributions in this field and in the last decade has made world class innovations for BAE Systems with direct benefits to customers around the world. Bingcai continues to develop and lead others in the development of key applications in the mapping field. His expertise in software development techniques has been applied to achieve superior technical and application productivity.

Recently, Bingcai was also appointed co-chair of the ASPRS Softcopy Photogrammetry Committee (SPC). SPC assists ASPRS members in understanding and practicing softcopy photogrammetry, maintains guidelines and standards for the profession, and provides a forum for professionals to share and exchange industry knowledge and experience. It tracks emerging technologies related to the advancement of softcopy photogrammetry and offers educational opportunities for the understanding of scientific and technical advancements in the field.

GXP in the news | May 2007

BAE Systems Sponsors Award for Excellence in Photogrammetry

Dr. John Brockhaus (center), with two West Point instructors, Maj. Christopher Oxendine and Maj. Allison Day, at the 2007 BAE SYSTEMS GXP International User Conference.

Dr. John Brockhaus (center), with two West Point instructors, Maj. Christopher Oxendine and Maj. Allison Day, at the 2007 BAE SYSTEMS GXP International User Conference.

The BAE Systems Award for Excellence in Photogrammetry will be presented to an outstanding student from the Geospatial Information Sciences program, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York. BAE Systems’ sponsorship of the Award, which will be presented at West Point’s GIS graduation awards ceremony on May 24, 2007, was announced at the 2007 GXP International User Conference in San Diego, California on March 29, 2007, in an address by Dr. John Brockhaus, Professor and Program Director, Geospatial Information Sciences program.

Destinations | May 2007

2007 GXP International User Conference

2007 GXP User Conference keynote speaker, John Gannon

2007 GXP User Conference keynote speaker, John Gannon

Thanks to all of our dedicated GXP software users, industry colleagues, and distinguished speakers for their contributions to this year’s User Conference.

A special thanks to…

Keynote speaker

John Gannon, VP for Global Analysis, BAE Systems, McLean, Virginia. John’s keynote presentation, Prospects for intelligence community analysis, was timely, compelling, and well received.

Guest speakers

SSgt Diego Balcazar, MCIA; Bill Bedard, NRL; John Brockhaus, West Point Military Academy; Brenda Burroughs, GeoEye™; Andy Dougherty, 3001 Inc.; Randy Kirk, U.S. Geological Survey; Dewey Marino, ESRI; Maryellen Sault, NOAA; and David Tressler, U.S. Air Force.

Industry exhibitors

3001, Applanix, ASPRS, ESRI, GeoEye, GeoWorld, MacNaughton, MaxVision®, Planar Systems, and Redhat.

May 2007 | SOCET GXP | Software update

SOCET GXP v3.0, summer 2008

Ribbon user interface NEW!

SOCET GXP v3.0 features the new Microsoft® Office 2007 Ribbon user interface. The customizable Ribbon organizes tasks by category to reduce the number of toolbars and buttons visible to the user. SOCET GXP v3.0′s photogrammetric functionality, previously available in SOCET SET, is completely redesigned, with updated GUIs and workflows to maximize productivity and enhance user experience.

May 2007 | SOCET GXP | Software update

SOCET GXP v2.3, summer 2007

Google Earth with synchronized viewing NEW!

Locate and preview imagery geographically using SOCET GXP and Google Earth as quick visual reference and discovery tools. Synchronized views update dynamically. Zoom, rotate, pan, roam, overlay images, and export graphics and image footprints.

SEE NEW!

SOCET GXP v2.3 contains a direct connection to the ESRI geodatabase. BAE Systems software supports this National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency initiative for storing graphics and features with their ground coordinates and attributes in a geodatabase for future retrieval and updating.

May 2007 | SOCET SET | Software update

SOCET SET v5.4, fall 2007

NGATE NEW!

NGATE uses new algorithms to produce extremely accurate elevation models for a wide variety of image and terrain types. More robust than previous technologies, NGATE dramatically reduces manual editing time and costs associated with producing terrain surface models. To test this exciting new product, contact the local GXP sales representative in your region for details (available with SOCET GXP v3.0, summer 2008).

Advanced sensor models NEW!

The NextView satellites are scheduled for launch in late 2007 with imagery provided six weeks after launch. Currently GeoEye-1 is scheduled first followed by WorldView-1; both satellites will be launched from Vandenberg AFB, California. There are also new sensor models for ALOS, ASTER, and FORMOSAT-2.

Terrain precision ENHANCED

Batch processing now allows creation of a terrain file based on coordinates in the batch processing settings file and enhanced performance for bare earth processing in Merge, ITE, NGATE and ATE.

SOCET for ArcGIS ENHANCED

Enhancements to auto-attribution and ArcMap synchronization.

May 2007 | Q & A

How do I transition from SOCET SET to SOCET GXP?

Think of the transition to SOCET GXP as either a maintenance upgrade, or a follow on to VITec® or SOCET SET.

Immediate Access

If you have active Upgrade Entitlement (UE), you can call our Reston, Virginia office toll-free (800) 316-9643, or direct (703) 668-4385, to request automatic shipment of SOCET GXP media.

UE

Each software purchase comes with a 90-day free warranty, as well as options to extend the warranty by purchasing the UE package. UE is an added benefit that is offered to licensed GXP software users. UE is based on your individual or site license and the modules you have purchased.

Training

Be sure to take advantage of the professional software training hosted by experienced GXP staff to get up and running as soon as possible. We offer many flexible options, including free training, and group sessions for up to eight people at our Reston, Virginia facility.

Transitioning SOCET SET projects to SOCET GXP

One of SOCET GXP’s strengths is its flexible project workflow infrastructure, referred to as the Workspace Manager. You can load all project files, including data, images, and features into the SOCET GXP Workspace Manager. SOCET GXP references the files on your computer, giving you the flexibility to store the information in the most intuitive way.

May 2007 | Tips and tricks

SOCET for ArcGIS tips

Introduction

SOCET for ArcGIS, a SOCET SET module, adds stereo digitizing to ArcGIS; 3D information is captured directly in the ESRI® environment. Users see their familiar ArcMap® surroundings and Editor functions with a stereoscopic window for data collection, and SOCET SET manages image organization behind the scenes. Everything works in 3D, and photogrammetric expertise is not required. SOCET for ArcGIS works with the geodatabase, whether personal or multiuser, and handles versioning and topology. Users benefit from SOCET SET’s rigorous handling of airborne and satellite imagery – it embeds the photogrammetry into ArcMap.

Tips

Increase performance while loading graphics

Set the stereo viewport graphics mode to Limited. When set to Full, refreshing graphics will redraw every feature loaded in ArcMap, but when set to Limited it will only load features within the viewport.

Use the synchronize cursor functionality to navigate quickly to a feature in the stereo viewport from the ArcMap canvas

  1. Map an accelerator key in ArcMap to the synchronize cursor function.
  2. Toggle on ArcMap tools, press the accelerator key, and move to the feature of interest in the ArcMap canvas.
  3. The stereo viewport will navigate to the image automatically as the cursor moves.
  4. Once you have reached the area of interest, press the accelerator key again to turn off tracking and switch back to the stereo viewport to edit the feature.

Learn more about any SOCET for ArcGIS preference setting

Press the “what’s this” tool ?, and click on any preference.

Customer and partner spotlight | May 2007

Swansea University uses SOCET SET to track glacial activity in Norway

Swansea University uses SOCET SET to track glacial activity in Norway

Swansea University uses SOCET SET to track glacial activity in Norway

SOCET SET customer Swansea University, in the U.K., is studying glacier melt in Svalbard, Norway. The glaciers around Svalbard could make the largest contribution to sea-level rise of any arctic region outside of Greenland. A field study, named Sea Level Rise from ICE in Svalbard (SLICES), was conducted to gather historic topographic data sets on sea-level rise for comparison with current records of the same area. Research began in 2003. The primary goal was to measure volume changes of the benchmark Svalbard glaciers, using LIDAR and photogrammetrically derived DEMs to provide a strong baseline for continued monitoring in the area. The findings were applied to the entire archipelago with a regional mass balance model, which was used to derive 20th and 21st century contributions to global sea-level rise in Svalbard.

Ice masses around the world are changing rapidly. The Glaciology group within the School of Environment and Society at Swansea is using advanced digital terrain modeling techniques to improve the quantification and our understanding of these changes. The group has chosen SOCET SET as our key photogrammetric data capture package. – Dr. Timothy James, Scientist, Swansea University, Swansea U.K.

Ice masses around the world are changing rapidly. The Glaciology group within the School of Environment and Society at Swansea is using advanced digital terrain modeling techniques to improve the quantification and our understanding of these changes. The group has chosen SOCET SET as our key photogrammetric data capture package. – Dr. Timothy James, Scientist, Swansea University, Swansea UK

For the SLICES project, there were many large images that had been captured at 1:50,000 scale and scanned at a high resolution to maximize DEM resolution. SOCET SET’s flexibility with large images, input file formats, and ASCII files was a major advantage. SOCET SET’s Automatic Terrain Extraction (ATE) and Interactive Terrain Editing (ITE) modules offer a combination of automated and manual tools for building terrain and surface models, and work equally well with new and century-old data.

Perspective view of a glacier in Svakbard, Norway

Perspective view of a glacier in Svakbard, Norway

Stereo matching on surfaces such as glaciers, with repeating patterns and a lack of texture, is notoriously difficult. Through the use of back-matching algorithms in ATE, the scientists have been able to eliminate many of the blunders that are normally associated with stereo matching on such surfaces, and thus obtain a better automated DEM with far less manual correction required.

Read the full story on the SLICES study, Imaging Notes, Spring 2007, pp. 24 – 29.

Read the full story on the SLICES study, Imaging Notes, Spring 2007, pp. 24 – 29.

Occasionally, in extremely steep areas, or areas where fresh snow cover makes stereo matching difficult, the team implements a hybrid approach, which involves measuring DEM points or breaklines manually in ITE, then using these as seed points in ATE. If stereo matching is unreliable, it is preferable to have a hole in the data, as opposed to blunders. A TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) DEM from ATE with back-matching yields much better results; it will identify such points as blunders and discard them.

Results from the study show that between 1961 and 2005 the average rate of melt was found to be about 0.47 meters vertically per year, with more melt occurring in recent years. Small glaciers like those in Svalbard represent only four percent of the world’s total land ice, but account for an estimated 20 to 30 percent of 20th century sea-level rise — and the melt has increased substantially since 1988. This work is extremely important for improving predictions of sea-level rise due to the density of population along the world’s coastlines.

Looking ahead, the Swansea Glaciology Group is turning its attention to Greenland, an area that has been identified as crucial for predicting future sea-level rise. For details on these and other projects underway within the Swansea Glaciology Group, please visit: http://geography.swan.ac.uk/glaciology/.

Bits and pieces | May 2007

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Bicentennial

Ted Doyle,  NOAA Team Lead for the Remote Sensing Division's Applications Branch, presents to Kevin Malone and Dan London this 200th birthday commemorative metal disk, fabricated in the style of the ground survey markers used by NOAA in their geodetic work.

Ted Doyle, NOAA Team Lead for the Remote Sensing Division's Applications Branch, presents to Kevin Malone and Dan London this 200th birthday commemorative metal disk, fabricated in the style of the ground survey markers used by NOAA in their geodetic work.

Celebrating 200 years of science, service, and stewardship

During the 2007 GXP International User Conference in March, GXP paid tribute to NOAA. This year NOAA commemorates the 200th anniversary of the agency’s Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) division. Founded in 1807 (as the Survey of the Coast) by Thomas Jefferson, the agency provided nautical charts to the maritime community for safe passage into American ports and along the coastline. Its mission increased to include surveys of the interior as the nation expanded westward and it was renamed C&GS in 1878.

NOAA was formed in 1970 from three agencies: the Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS), the Weather Bureau, and the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries. The National Ocean Service was created as a line office of NOAA and the part responsible for geodetic functions was named the National Geodetic Survey (NGS). A long-time user of BAE Systems’ SOCET SET software, NGS is responsible for geodetic surveying, control networks, and other tasks that provide the fundamental framework for mapping.